tedx:

Watch the whole talk here»

At TEDxDelft in The Netherlands, Dr. John Cohn — Chief Scientist of Design Automation at IBM and the force behind 60 patents issued or pending in the field of design automationgave a rousing talk on why we need to be more playful — in and outside of work and school.

Watch it yourself for a dose of inspiration, and make sure to look out for the smoking pickle (no, really) at 5:22.

(But don’t forget to always seek out adult supervision and be super careful when carrying out experiments. Stay safe and have fun!)

@1 day ago with 3978 notes

(Source: academihahaha, via comaniddy)

@5 days ago with 585 notes

crystalizedorangepeels:

Artist: 月野

Source

@5 days ago with 27 notes
#DW #fanart #lu lingqi #chen gong 
journaldelamode:

Catherine Mcneil By Mario Testino For Uk Vogue September 2013

journaldelamode:

Catherine Mcneil By Mario Testino For Uk Vogue September 2013

@5 days ago with 36 notes
#vogue #b&w 
superlinguo:


indikos:
"Pay attention, 2014 Mad Men: This little girl is holding a LEGO set. The LEGOs are not pink or "made for girls." She isn’t even wearing pink. The copy is about "younger children" who "build for fun." Not just "girls" who build. ALL KIDS.In an age when little girls and boys are treated as though they are two entirely different species by toy marketers, this 1981 ad for LEGO — one of our favorite images ever — issues an important reminder.” -Jessica Samakow
Full article here

What it is is a psuedo-cleft sentence. 
;)
(via somtum)

superlinguo:

indikos:

"Pay attention, 2014 Mad Men: This little girl is holding a LEGO set. The LEGOs are not pink or "made for girls." She isn’t even wearing pink. The copy is about "younger children" who "build for fun." Not just "girls" who build. ALL KIDS.

In an age when little girls and boys are treated as though they are two entirely different species by toy marketers, this 1981 ad for LEGO — one of our favorite images ever — issues an important reminder.” -Jessica Samakow

Full article here

What it is is a psuedo-cleft sentence

;)

(via somtum)

@5 days ago with 3087 notes

dillywillyz:

vesley:

nightnursenotes:

icuisafourletterword:

How to fix the nursing shortage.

This is the cutest CPR ever.

this fucking baby is more skilled than I am

She even plugged the nose

(Source: onlylolgifs, via ohhh--nana)

@4 days ago with 265971 notes

sleepingwithpiercethemice:

serotonical:

How to break out of a zip-tie- potentially life-saving information

You guys, please share it. You never know when someone is going to need this information.

(via modellsta)

@5 days ago with 463338 notes

braidcut asked: Your fashion-sense and how you incorporate it into your art is enviable. Naki, do you have any favorite designers?

yoyonaki:

TBH I love italian designers/fashion house than American designers/fashion house. I think its because italian designers show more “formal/casual” designs and they are all about high class luxury more than the American designers (I mean I love Alexander Wang/Tom Ford but then I feel like it doesn’t show rich/high class).

I love Dolce & Gabbana because they think of a story and they design the clothes to go with it. All their clothes have story/themes (like summer 2014 were all about money (like ancient gold money) and Sicily (because Sicily is well known for arts, music, and their architecture). Valentino is also my fav because of his simple designs on all of his clothes (and he loves the color red a lot lol)….I feel like he focuses on shapes a lot in his clothes

and of course I love GUCCI/Bulgari/PRADA/VERSACE because pretty much GUCCI/Bulgari/PRADA/VERSACE screams “CLASS” and “FASHION”….i feel like they love to experiment with a lot of pattern/colors (and gOD THEIR BAGS are so pretty)

I have so many lists of designers I love (they’re all italians LOL…and some few american)….but my top three are: D&G, GUCCI, and Valentino

@5 days ago with 23 notes

theolduvaigorge:

Blown Glass Microbiology Sculptures

  • by artist Luke Jerram

"Luke Jerram has created a number of extraordinary art projects which have excited and inspired people around the globe.Luke Jerram’s practice involves the creation of sculptures, installations, live arts projects and gifts. He is a Visiting Senior Research Fellow at the University of West of England. 

About Glass Microbiology
Glass Microbiology is a body of glass work which has been developed by artist Luke Jerram since 2004. Made to contemplate the global impact of each disease, the artworks are created as alternative representations of viruses to the artificially coloured imagery received through the media. In fact, viruses have no colour as they are smaller than the wavelength of light. By extracting the colour from the imagery and creating jewel-like beautiful sculptures in glass, a complex tension has arisen between the artworks’ beauty and what theyrepresent.

The Glass Microbiology sculptures are in museum collections around the world, including The Metropolitan Museum, NYC, The Wellcome Collection, London and The Museum of Glass, Shanghai. They are also regularly displayed in exhibitions around the globe and also sold to private collectors. In 2010, Jerram received the 25th Rakow Award for the series from The Corning Museum of Glass, New York. In 2009, his sculptures were presented at The Mori Museum, Tokyo along with work by Damien Hirst, Warhol and Leonardo da Vinci.

His transparent and colourless glassworks consider how the artificial colouring of scientific microbiological imagery, affects our understanding of these phenomena. See these examples of HIV imagery. If some images are coloured for scientific purposes, and others altered simply for aesthetic reasons, how can a viewer tell the difference? How many people believe viruses are brightly coloured? Are there any colour conventions and what kind of ‘presence’ do pseudocoloured images have that ‘naturally’ coloured specimens don’t? How does the choice of different colours affect their reception?

Photographs of Jerram’s glass artworks are now used widely in medical journals, text books and media stories and are seen as useful representations of virology within the scientific community. His work has been presented in the Lancet, the British Medical Journal and on the front cover of Nature Magazine.

The sculptures are designed in consultation with virologists from the University of Bristol, using a combination of different scientific photographs and models. They are made in collaboration with glassblowers Kim George, Brian Jones and Norman Veitch.

Limited Editions
Jerram’s Glass Microbiology artworks are available for sale to private collectors and public museums. Artworks are signed and dated, limited editions of just 5.”

(Source: Glass Microbiology by Luke Jeram via BuzzFeed)

(via scientificillustration)

@5 days ago with 2246 notes
ohhh—nana:

❤️

ohhh—nana:

❤️

(Source: strange-loyaltys)

@5 days ago with 1351772 notes